Sunday 2018 March 11th, a day that will live in infamy! Yet another (@#%(*^%@#!! daylight saving time switch.
Luckily, some with pull are starting to think about it now as well:

Daylight Saving Time isn’t worth it, European Parliament members say
EU says holdover from post-WWI efficiency efforts isn’t relevant in today’s world.

From: https://arstechnica.com/tech-policy/2018/02/daylight-saving-time-isnt-worth-it-european-parliament-ministers-say/
Earlier this week the European Parliament voted 384 to 153 to review whether Daylight Saving Time is actually worth it. Although the resolution it voted on was non-binding, the majority reflected a growing dissatisfaction with a system that has been used by the US, Canada, most of Europe, and regions in Asia, Africa, and South America for decades.

The resolution asked the European Commission to review the costs and benefits of Daylight Saving Time. If the EU were to abolish Daylight Saving Time, it would need approval of the majority of EU member states and EU Parliament members.

I could not agree more.
How much more dangerous is it to drive the next morning after a change? Much more.
https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/11152980

How much less healthy is it after a change?
From http://www.cbc.ca/news/canada/end-of-daylight-saving-time-2015-6-eye-opening-facts-1.3296353
Daylight time and heart attacks
A study presented to the American College of Cardiology in March 2014, based on data collected from Michigan hospitals between 2010 and 2013, indicated that the number of patients admitted for heart attacks spiked 25 per cent on the Monday immediately after clocks sprang forward for daylight saving time (the first day when the average person had to get up an hour earlier for work). The study’s authors were careful to note that they had not proved a definitive link to the time change itself or changes in sleep patterns.

Daylight time and heart attacks
A study presented to the American College of Cardiology in March 2014, based on data collected from Michigan hospitals between 2010 and 2013, indicated that the number of patients admitted for heart attacks spiked 25 per cent on the Monday immediately after clocks sprang forward for daylight saving time (the first day when the average person had to get up an hour earlier for work). The study’s authors were careful to note that they had not proved a definitive link to the time change itself or changes in sleep patterns.

The amount of time wasted to make the change is on the order of two manhours around our household. Changing a simple clock is easy. Changing a digital one with a poor user interface is frustrating. Checking the programming and scripts on computers is a challenge. Having automated data processing scripts break when some systems are on UTC and others are changing from EST to EDT or back again breaks things. Legacy operating systems (running data loggers or system controls that do not work on more modern OS’s) don’t get updates and still think DST change is later in the year. They break twice each season.

arrg!

Stop Daylight Saving Time Now!

Oh, and don’t forget this:
Daylight saving time ends this Sunday, November 5: Don’t forget to fall back
This is a re-post of an article published last year because daylight saving time will always be annoying.

First introduced to Canada 100 years ago as a way to save coal, the project is now an annual eight-month ritual tolerated purely due to the belief that it’s good for us. In March, we skip our clocks ahead one hour to inject more sunlight into the evenings. Then, in November, we switch them back to “standard time.”

But if government-mandated clock shifts annoy you, you’re not alone. A hefty body of scientific research is backing up the theory that this whole clock-switching thing might be a literal waste of time.